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What is Dogma?

Dogma

Dogma refers to a belief system that is accepted by the members of a group or a society without being doubted or questioned for its authenticity or importance. This dogma might exist in the form of a professional religion’s principles or doctrines, like Roman Catholicism, Judaism, or Protestantism. A dogma can also be present in a philosopher’s agendas or a philosophical school like positivism, postmodernism, egalitarianism, and dark enlightenment. Additionally, it can also be found in political belief systems, such as Marxism, communism, progressivism, liberalism, conservatism, and fascism.

In the traditional meaning of the word, dogma is known to symbolize enforced decisions that the layperson cannot counter. They refer to the decisions taken by aggressive political interests or authorities, which stand for strong beliefs that are not open to rational discussion. This attitude is somewhat dogmatic, which is often used for religious agendas and their propagation among communities. This dogma, however, is not limited to theistic perspectives alone and is often used in political or philosophical contexts as well, as is mentioned above.

Dogma in Religion

In the professional sense of the word, Dogma was used formally by some theistic religious groups to denote the group’s major faith. These foundational or essential beliefs refer to an entire set of traditional ideas conveyed by a theistic or non-theistic religious group. However, Dogma is considered more critical than mere religious opinion or a less significant or uncertain doctrine. A formal Dogma by the church needs to be clarified and elaborated upon in its communication.

Buddhism

A View or a position is a primary idea in Buddhism that connotes the Western notion of Dogma and its definition. In the Buddhist thought system, a view is not simple. It is not merely an abstract collection of propositions but a symbol of experience and learning. This experience is meant to shape and affect its bearer’s thoughts, sensations, and actions. This view is an integral part of the Buddhist path.

Having the correct attitude toward views allows one to correct themselves before committing to a decision or even abandon it before it’s too late. Sometimes, because of these views' rigid structure and monopoly, they can also be viewed as restrictive obstacles to an individual’s enlightenment.

Christianity

In the Christian Church and its belief system, Dogma is a faith communicated by divine revelation and described by the Church. The Church’s official interpretation of divine revelation ranges from defined to non-defined dogmas. Theologians have distinguished between the two in a way that the former symbolizes dogmas held by authoritative bodies like the Roman Curia for the Catholic Church. The latter is universally recognized but is yet to be defined. One example of the latter non-defined dogmas is the nature of Christ as a universal redeemer.

The term Dogma is said to be based on late Greek philosophy’s legal usage. It was meant to denote a decree or a command, which later became known in the same sense in early Christian theology. Christianity is understood to represent a set of core beliefs and schools of thought, which is shared by everyone who believes in the religion. However, how these core beliefs are implemented within the religion varies from person to person.

When these beliefs are referred to in an organization’s formal communication, they are known as ‘dogmata.’ An organization’s mannerisms and formal religious position are communicated to its new members through a thorough teaching and learning procession. While these processions don’t comply with a rigid attendance structure, these organizations require memberships for some church activities.

When these beliefs are referred to in an organization’s formal communication, they are known as ‘dogmata.’ An organization’s mannerisms and formal religious position are communicated to its new members through a thorough teaching and learning procession. While these processions don’t comply with a rigid attendance structure, these organizations require memberships for some church activities.

Islam

In Islam, Quran, Hadith, and aqidah connote themselves with different views across cultural and theological lines. These beliefs correspond to the Latin term dogma/dogmata.

Judaism

The word Dogma in Jewish Kabbalah has the exact origin of the term archetype. While commenting on the Jewish tradition of logical thought, dogma is a principle by which Rabbanim of Talmud and after Talmud-Era prove faith, God’s existence, truth, etc.

Joseph Albo uses the word dogma to explain other tenets of Judaism. Dogma is the fundamental tool necessarily accurate for rational thinking. This is also discussed in the Jewish book “Fons Vitae” of Solomon ibn Gabirol. The “Partzuf” is the hypothesis to understand what is “dogma” in the relation between “logical thinking” and “rational Kabbalah.”


Psychic development
Gabriel Angel
Guardian Angel